Shuttle No More!

By Dr. Robert Wallace

May 14, 2020 5 min read

DR. WALLACE: I'm 19, and so is my boyfriend. We both graduated from high school last year. My problem is that my boyfriend doesn't own a car and doesn't have a driver's license. This causes me to be his chauffeur. Both of us have jobs, so I have to pick him up at his house, drive him to work and then pick him up after work. Sometimes, I'm a touch tardy arriving to my job, but I haven't gotten into any trouble for being late because I have a really nice boss.

How do I get my boyfriend to get his driver's license and his own vehicle? By the way, his parents won't drive him anywhere, so I'm stuck being his shuttle service and have been for months now. — Girl on the Go, East Lansing, Michigan

GIRL ON THE GO: Your boyfriend may be one of the last few 19-year-old guys living in North America who doesn't have a driver's license! Give him a week's notice, and tell him that you won't be able to drive him to and from work anymore.

This will force him to either get a driver's license and a car or take public transportation — like Uber or Lyft!

This can also give you a little insight into your relationship. If your boyfriend accepts this and thanks you for all of the previous rides you've provided him, he passes the test.

But if he complains bitterly or takes anything out on you, it will be a good indicator of future times to come with this young man. Either way, he'll reveal something valuable to you. Simply stay cool, and remain firm on your position of no future rides (except for emergencies). Then watch his reaction.

A self-sufficient, resourceful young man will figure this out; necessity breeds competence in reliable people. Hopefully, your beau fits this category!

GOOD STUDENTS SHOULD ALWAYS GO FOR IT!

DR. WALLACE: I'd like to respond to the girl who had a high IQ and her counselor forced her to take college prep courses even though she didn't plan on attending college.

The very same situation happened to me! I, too, was considered intelligent, and my counselors strongly "suggested" that I continue to stay on the college prep track. I didn't enjoy spending almost two hours per night on homework. I was not planning on attending college because my single mother raised me alone, and money was scarce in our family.

During my senior year, I was fortunate to earn a full scholarship to an excellent university. My college prep program ended up paying off for me big-time. I am now an attorney with one of the most prestigious law firms in our city. Needless to say, my mother no longer has to monitor every penny, and I even helped her with a down payment on a small condo that she really enjoys these days.

Students should always do their very best because no one can accurately predict the future, and education is the key to an enjoyable prosperous existence. My new motto is, "If you have the skills, work hard to sharpen and use them." — Happy to Have Prepped, via email

HAPPY TO HAVE PREPPED: As a former high school coach, teacher and administrator, I couldn't agree with you more. Any success that I have achieved is directly the result of a quality education served up by dedicated, inspirational instructors.

After graduating from Emerson High School in Gary, Indiana, my initial plan was to enter the steel mills on the shores of Lake Michigan and toil there for a lifetime with a steady job.

However, the Navy came calling, and fate and a few college degrees altered my plan dramatically. I'm very happy now, looking back at how I was able to take advantage of the educational opportunities that were afforded me, starting with the GI Bill.

I agree fully with your motto and encourage all students to take full advantage of any and all educational opportunities that come their way.

Dr. Robert Wallace welcomes questions from readers. Although he is unable to reply to all of them individually, he will answer as many as possible in this column. Email him at [email protected] To find out more about Dr. Robert Wallace and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

Photo credit: Free-Photos at Pixabay

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