Suicide? No. Society is Murdering Us

By Ted Rall

June 15, 2018 5 min read

They say that 10 million Americans seriously consider committing suicide every year. In 1984, when I was 20, I was one of them.

Most people who kill themselves feel hopeless. They are miserable and distraught and can't imagine how or if their lives will ever improve. That's how I felt. Within a few months I got expelled from college, dumped by a girlfriend I foolishly believed I would marry, fired from my job and evicted from my apartment. I was homeless, bereft, broke. I didn't have enough money for more than a day of cheap food. And I had no prospects.

I tried in vain to summon up the guts to jump off the roof of my dorm. I went down to the subway but couldn't make myself jump in front of a train. I wanted to. But I couldn't.

Obviously things got better. I'm writing this.

Things got better because my luck changed. But — why did it have to? Isn't there something wrong with a society in which life or death turns on luck?

I wish I could tell my 20-year-old self that suicide isn't necessary, that there is another way, that there will be plenty of time to be dead in the end. I've seen those other ways when I've traveled overseas.

In Central Asia and exotic places and all over the world you will find Americans whose lives ran hard against the shoals of bankruptcy, lost love, addiction or social shame. Rather than off themselves, they gathered their last dollars and headed to the airport and went somewhere else to start over. They showed up at some dusty ex-pat bar in the middle of nowhere with few skills other than speaking English and asked if they could crash in the back room and wash dishes. Eventually they scraped together enough money to conduct tours for Western tourists, maybe working as a dive-master or taking rich vacationers deep-sea fishing. They weren't rich themselves; they were OK and that was more than enough.

You really can start over. But maybe not in this uptight, stuck-up, class-stratified country.

You can opt out of a bad situation without having to opt out of life.

Up 30 percent since 1999, suicide has become an accelerating national epidemic — but the only times the media focuses on suicide is when it claims the lives of celebrities like Kate Spade and Anthony Bourdain. While the media has made inroads by trying to cover high-profile suicides discreetly so as to minimize suicidal ideation and inspiring others to follow their example, it's frustrating that no one seems to want to identify societal and political factors so that this trend might be reversed.

Experts believe that roughly half of men who commit suicide suffer from undiagnosed mental illness such as a severe personality disorder or clinical depression. Men commit suicide in substantially higher numbers than women. The healthcare insurance business isn't much help. One in five Americans is mentally ill but 60 percent get no treatment at all.

Then there's stress. Journalistic outlets and politicians don't target the issue of stress in any meaningful way other than to foolishly, insipidly advise people to avoid it. If you subject millions of people to inordinate stress, some of them, the fragile ones, will take their own lives. We should be working to create a society that minimizes rather than increases stress.

It doesn't require a lot of heavy lifting to come up with major sources of stress in American society. People are working longer hours but earning lower pay. Even people with jobs are terrified of getting laid off without a second's notice. The American healthcare system, designed to fatten for-profit healthcare corporations, is a sick joke. When you lose your job or get sick, that shouldn't be your problem alone. We're social creatures. We must help each other personally, locally and through strong safety-net social programs.

Loneliness and isolation are likely leading causes of suicide; technology is alienating us from one another. This is a national emergency. We have to discuss it and act.

Life in the United States has become vicious and brutal, too much to take even for this nation founded upon the individualistic principles of rugged libertarian pioneers. Children are pressured to exhibit fake joy and success on social media. Young adults are burdened with gigantic student loans they strongly suspect they will never be able to repay. The middle-aged are divorced, outsourced, downsized and repeatedly told they are no longer relevant. And the elderly are thrown away or warehoused, discarded and forgotten by the children they raised.

We don't have to live this way. It's a choice. Like the American ex-pats I run into overseas, American society can opt out of crazy-making capitalism without having to opt out.

Ted Rall, an editorial cartoonist and columnist, is the author of "Francis: The People's Pope."

Photo credit: at Pixabay

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