creators.com opinion web
Liberal Opinion Conservative Opinion
Marc Dion
Marc Dion
20 Oct 2014
White Man's Jesus

He was white. All you had to do was look. The statues. The crucifix. The little pictures in our little books. … Read More.

13 Oct 2014
Training a Cat to Nap

When I was a boy, growing up in Missouri, there were people who would say that a particularly challenging … Read More.

6 Oct 2014
It's Not Beheading Unless You Do It With a Knife

You're sitting in your apartment in a midsized Syrian city, or maybe you're relaxing in your farmhouse just … Read More.

How Do Atheists Feel About Tacky?

Comment

Right now, the born-agains, the atheists and the patriots (no, not the football team) are tussling about a circa 1934 homemade 7-foot cross erected in the middle of a million or so acres of weeds and snakes.

This is good. The argument cannot offend the glorious dead, who are past offending, and it makes good fodder for keyboard klowns like me who otherwise would have to look for work at the mall. If you can imagine Bill O'Reilly as a clerk at The Gap, then you know just how important it is to provide legitimate work for commentators.

The cross is in memory of World War I vets, who are not coming back, though something of them lingers on in our nation's numerous, often untended memorials. In fact, if you are considering building a memorial to the dead in Iraq or Afghanistan, I urge you to top it with a cross. Controversy will give it symbolic value, and symbolic value will assure ideological combat, which will guarantee upkeep. It's a good idea to plan ahead.

In 1934, when the cross was erected, it was assumed that most people in America were Christian, and those who were not knew better than to stick out from the crowd. This is not the case in 2010, when sticking out from the crowd is a lifetime job for most of us and, in particular, for small groups of cultural warriors who fiercely resist the nearly constant indifference of the America public. It's tough to be a martyr when no one wants to burn you at the stake.

I can solve this problem, and in doing so, I hope to avoid working at The Gap.

The problem with the big memorial cross in the Mojave Desert is that it's too simple. It's too stark. It's the kind of thing my grandfather might have built in his backyard if he had suddenly been overtaken by the love of Jesus.

It's simple and small-town pious, and is therefore irritating and cannot exist alongside the culture's present fascination with the overbuilt, the loud and the tawdry.

So, what you do is you head out into the desert and you start "multiculturaling" the memorial. Get some menorahs, a couple Buddhas, a Ganesh, maybe one of those green banners with Arabic writing on it, a light-up statue of Santa Claus, a few African animist gods, a representation of the Haitian Voodoo Baron Samedi, the Santeria Chango, a tree for the Druids among us, one of those mandalas they like in the Hollywood section of Tibet — get all that stuff.

And don't buy good quality statues, either. Buy cheap, guaranteed-to-weather-badly, plastic junk religious symbols made in China and coated liberally with unknown amounts of lead, cadmium and arsenic. If anything you buy looks like DaVinci painted it, pitch it out.

Take all the religious symbols and put them around the cross, but put 'em much too close together, like a display in the window of a poor neighborhood dollar store.

Make it look like crap. Some people in this country object to religion, but hardly anyone objects to crap. Ask the networks.

What atheist is gonna take that seriously? Even the ACLU, which is nearly choking on its own seriousness, would find it hard to sue over a reckless, ugly jumble of poorly made junk. If you get really lucky, some over-luxuried critic from New York City will decide the whole thing is "folk art," and it will become officially valuable to the 300 people who follow the utterances of the over-luxuried critic.

The glorious dead ain't comin' back, and if they do, why not give 'em a laugh? An army is full of humor, much of it impolite and not a little of it directed at the government.

Anyway, the glorious dead didn't want a monument. They wanted to make it home alive.

To find out more about Marc Munroe Dion and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit www.creators.com

COPYRIGHT 2010 BY CREATORS.COM



Comments

2 Comments | Post Comment
Just a great column. Dion is probably misplaced as a liberal comlumnist. His voice is true; a sonata of goodwill. The thoughts are high-arched so he never resonates shrill, bossy, or rushed. Nothing narrow here. Dion's style is effortlessly personal. He likes people and trusts them. The feeling is mutual from this corner of the ring.
Comment: #1
Posted by: Tom
Mon Jun 7, 2010 9:58 AM
Why should we build any monuments at all if in a hundred years people decide they are offensive, unattractive or in the way of their new shopping mall or chic subdivision. Considering that aspect, the monuments of the past should have as much relevance today as they did then. The problem with the cross is it's existence on public land.

Remembering the Obama speech at Georgetown university in 2009 at which time it was requested by the White House that all religious symbolism be covered up tells the story of how religious tolerance is weakening when it should be gaining strength. It was kinda dumb when you consider how much God is represented in DC.

Fact is that a great deal of religious symbolism still exists in and around the country but most people don't pay much attention to them. Everyone is still engaging in finance with money stating In God We Trust. Maybe some people don't trust but it doesn't matter if they are making and spending it.

Should the Christians hide the symbol of their faith to appease those offended by it? Should Jews stop wearing yarmulkes out of fear of reprisal? Should Muslim mosques, Buddhist temples and all other religious structures become bland looking boxes because people don't want to see them?

The cross should stay because is it a memorial just like any other. I think Congress will realize that the government is not endorsing any religion but is endorsing a 1934 memorial to WWI Veterans. Just my opinion.

How much of our history will we as a country be forced to trash?

Comment: #2
Posted by: Thomas Parinello
Thu Oct 28, 2010 8:29 PM
Already have an account? Log in.
New Account  
Your Name:
Your E-mail:
Your Password:
Confirm Your Password:

Please allow a few minutes for your comment to be posted.

Enter the numbers to the right:  
Creators.com comments policy
More
Marc Dion
Oct. `14
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
28 29 30 1 2 3 4
5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14 15 16 17 18
19 20 21 22 23 24 25
26 27 28 29 30 31 1
About the author About the author
Write the author Write the author
Printer friendly format Printer friendly format
Email to friend Email to friend
View by Month
Ray Hanania
Ray HananiaUpdated 23 Oct 2014
Matt Towery
Matt ToweryUpdated 23 Oct 2014
R. Emmett Tyrrell
R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr.Updated 23 Oct 2014

13 Nov 2012 Monuments Instead of Achievements

12 May 2014 Rise, Sir Knight

25 Mar 2013 Obama Makes Us All Heroes