About Scott Rasmussen

Scott Rasmussen

Scott Rasmussen

Scott Rasmussen is a Senior Fellow for the Study of Self-Governance at The King’s College in New York City.  He is also an Editor-at-Large at Ballotpedia, the Encyclopedia of American Politics.

A familiar face on television news programs, Rasmussen spent two decades as one of the world’s leading public opinion pollsters. The Wall Street Journal calls him “a key player in the contact sport of politics.” The Washington Post adds that Scott is a “driving force in American politics.”

In partnership with Ballotpedia, he releases “Scott Rasmussen’s Number of the Day.” The feature highlights newsworthy and interesting topics at the intersection of politics, culture, and technology.

At King’s he is guiding development of an Institute for Community Driven Solutions. That Institute grew out of the message from his latest book, Politics Has Failed: America Will Not (2017).

Like most Americans, Rasmussen believes our nation’s political system is badly broken. Unlike most, however, he is very optimistic about America’s future. His book reminds us that governing involves far more than government. In fact, every organization and relationship has a vital role to play in governing society. It’s not about politics. It’s about figuring out the best way we can work together to find solutions.

A serial entrepreneur, Scott is the founder of Rasmussen Reports, co-founder of ESPN, a New York Times bestselling author, public speaker, and syndicated columnist. Scott did his first radio commercial at the age of 7 and made his national television debut at 20. A career highlight was serving as emcee for hockey legend Gordie Howe’s 50th birthday celebration. Howe had been Scott’s childhood idol.

Scott graduated with a degree in history from DePauw University and earned his MBA at Wake Forest University.

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Allegations Against Brett Kavanaugh Fail to Move Public Opinion Sep 20, 2018

Despite enormous media coverage and intense discussions in official Washington, the allegations leveled against Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh have had little impact on public opinion (so far). Before his confirmation hearings, a ScottRasmusse... Read More

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Not Every Problem Needs a Federal Solution Sep 13, 2018

Fifty-five percent of voters believe that Facebook has too much power. Forty-seven percent believe the same about Twitter. For those in the political world, such numbers represent an obvious call for government action. But voters disagree. Just 21 pe... Read More

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Protesting During the National Anthem, Freedom of Speech and Justice Sep 06, 2018

Sixty-nine percent of voters nationwide believe freedom of speech is "absolutely essential." Another 23 percent believe it is "very important." In a deeply polarized political era, it's encouraging — and amazing — to find that 9 in 10 Ame... Read More