About Dennis Mammana

Dennis Mammana

Dennis Mammana

For more than three decades, Dennis Mammana has shared the wonder and mystery of the cosmos with audiences around the world. With a B.A. in physics from Otterbein College and an M.S. in astronomy from Vanderbilt University, Mammana has held positions at the Smithsonian's National Air & Space Museum, the University of Arizona, and San Diego's Reuben H. Fleet Science Center. He now works as an astronomy writer, lecturer and photographer from under the clear dark skies of Southern California's Anza-Borrego Desert. Mammana is the author of six books on astronomy, hundreds of popular magazine and encyclopedia articles and, since 1992, has written "Stargazers," the only nationally syndicated weekly newspaper column on astronomy.

As an accomplished night-sky photographer, his stunning images have appeared in a variety of media and international exhibitions, and can be enjoyed at his website, www.dennismammana.com. He is an invited member of TWAN — The World At Night — an international team of the world's most highly acclaimed sky photographers.

A dynamic public speaker, Mammana has entertained and informed audiences on six continents at resorts, on cruise ships and as an after-dinner speaker, and leads public tours to view and photograph such celestial displays as the aurora borealis and total solar eclipses. He makes frequent appearances on both radio and television.

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When Darkness Falls May 28, 2020

Week of May 31 - June 6, 2020 Sometimes, we astronomers toss around terms that we consider to be "obvious" — and to us, they are — but people who hear or read our words often wonder just what the heck we're talking about. One example is ... Read More

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The Celestial Strongman May 21, 2020

Week of May 24-30, 2020 No matter how long I study the sky, there will always be star groupings I just can't "see". Certainly, the ancients didn't make it easy for us; they never actually devised the constellations to look like animals, objects and p... Read More

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Seeing the Inner Planets at Dusk May 14, 2020

Week of May 17-23, 2020 Mercury is the closest planet to the sun, yet it's not the hottest of our solar system. That honor belongs to Venus, nearly twice as far from the searing heat of our star. Why should that be? The reason, of course, is rather ... Read More

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A Cosmic Menagerie May 07, 2020

Week of May 10-16, 2020 Nearly every indigenous culture on Earth established its own unique set of constellations in their sky, but we in the West recognize those created primarily by the Greeks and early European explorers and astronomers. To produ... Read More