About Connie Schultz

Connie Schultz

Connie Schultz

Columnist Connie Schultz won the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for commentary for what the judges called her "pungent columns that provided a voice for the underdog and the underprivileged." It is a common theme in her work.

In addition to the Pulitzer, Schultz won the Scripps Howard National Journalism Award for commentary and the National Headliner Award for commentary. She was also elected to the Cleveland Journalism Hall of Fame.

She was a 2003 Pulitzer Prize finalist in feature writing for her series "The Burden of Innocence," which chronicled the ordeal of Michael Green, who was imprisoned for 13 years for a rape he did not commit. The week after her series ran, the real rapist turned himself in after reading her stories. He is currently serving a five-year prison sentence. Her series won numerous honors, including the Robert F. Kennedy Award for Social Justice Reporting, the National Headliner Award's Best of Show and journalism awards from both Harvard College and Columbia University.

In 2004, Schultz won the Batten Medal, which honors "a body of journalistic work that reflects compassion, courage, humanity and a deep concern for the underdog."

Schultz's first book, Life Happens – And Other Unavoidable Truths, was published by Random House in April 2006. Her second book, … And His Lovely Wife, is a memoir about her husband’s race for the Senate. It was released by Random House in June 2007.

Schultz is married to U.S. Sen. Sherrod Brown. They have four children.

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Parenting, Now Apr 02, 2020

Earlier this week, our daughter Cait texted a photo capturing a moment of her juggling her job and her two young children at home. At first, I noticed only Cait's hand on the laptop, but as I studied it I saw the reason for snapping the picture. Tw... Read More

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Not This Grandma Mar 26, 2020

My, these aging men with their bright ideas. First, it was the president, who has been openly contradicting medical experts with his pining for an early end to social distancing. This would threaten the lives of millions of Americans during the pand... Read More

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When This Pandemic Ends, We'll Have Decisions to Make Mar 19, 2020

A favorite book I try never to be without is by the late Irish poet and priest John O'Donohue. It's on my bedside table, on my Kindle and on the Kindle app on my phone. One needn't be Catholic (I'm not) or Irish (I am, but I try not to brag) to appre... Read More

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Panic, If You Must, And Then Pivot Mar 12, 2020

When is the last time someone told you to calm down, and it worked? I'm not seeing a lot of raised hands. Having someone tell us we're overreacting is annoying and condescending. Infuriating, even. It makes you want to blind them with the whites of ... Read More