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Trivia Bits for Apr 18, 2014 He started composing as a child, but as the old joke goes, on Dec. 5, 1791, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart started decomposing. He was not, in fact, buried in a pauper's grave, but was interred in a communal grave just outside the city walls of Vienna in …Read more. Trivia Bits for Apr 17, 2014 Strictly speaking, there is no English word that rhymes with "orange." But if you're flexible and include proper nouns, you can rhyme orange with Blorenge, which is a mountain in Wales. Eminem once said that you can also rhyme it with door hinge, …Read more. Trivia Bits for Apr 16, 2014 John Lennon's last live performance wasn't with the Beatles, or with Yoko Ono, but with Elton John. In 1974, he joined John on stage at Madison Square Garden to perform the song they co-wrote, "Whatever Gets You Through the Night." This was Lennon's …Read more. Trivia Bits for Apr 15, 2014 Hollywood, always looking for potential franchises with name recognition, has started looking to classic board games. Despite the fact that a version of "Clue" didn't exactly set the world on fire, Universal released a movie version of "Battleship." …Read more.
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PAUL'S TRIVIABITS (TM) - DAILY

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Although he didn't invent radar, what "MASH" star did invent Chum Magic, which lures fish to boats?

A) Alan Alda

B) Gary Burghoff

C) Jamie Farr

D) Wayne Rogers

Previous answer: Mexico has the world's largest community of American expatriates.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Tuesday, February 5

In addition to being a precious metal, silver is also deadly for bacteria. And unlike lead and mercury, which are also unfriendly for bacteria, silver isn't toxic to us. As such, silver coins used to be thrown down wells. And it is still used to treat athlete's foot. Scientists are now looking at the ways silver can be used in bandages and dressings.

What state's westernmost point is 95 miles further west than West Virginia's westernmost point?

A) Maryland

B) Ohio

C) Pennsylvania

D) Virginia

Previous answer: Gary Burghoff, who played Radar, is also an inventor.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Wednesday, February 6

Broadway shows get their inspiration from a lot of unusual sources. "West Side Story," for example, was inspired by "Romeo and Juliet." That brings us to "Rockabye Hamlet." Originally called "Kronborg: 1582," it was commissioned by Canada's CBC TV network. After touring Canada, it launched on Broadway in 1976. And flopped terribly. Songs like "The Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Boogie" certainly didn't help.

In his very first game in 1997, Florida Marlins pitcher Antonio Alfonseca set a new record, with 12. What record did he set?

A) Base hits for a pitcher

B) Grand slams given up

C) Player with the most fingers

D) Unforced errors

Previous answer: Virginia actually extends further west than West Virginia.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Thursday, February 7

In Iran, you can buy Barf-branded soap and laundry detergents from a company called Paxan. That's because, in Farsi, "barf" means "snow." It also means "snow" in Urdu. Barf, by the way, has expanded into Uzbekistan, where it is very popular. Yeah, this is hilarious. But English words and idioms can sound strange in foreign languages, too. KFC's "finger-licking good" becomes a Chinese exhortation to eat your fingers.

Emil Sitka was the one of only two people to appear on film with all six members of what comedy outfit?

A) Marx Brothers

B) Monty Python

C) Our Gang

D) Three Stooges

Previous answer: Antonio Alfonseca had 12 fingers.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Friday, February 8

A tesseract is an extradimensional hypercube, which is somehow bigger inside than it appears to be from the outside. The best example is the TARDIS from "Doctor Who," but there are others, notably for comic effect: Fibber McGee's closet, Oscar the Grouch's trash can, Snoopy's dog house and so on. The Cosmic Cube, a major plot point in many Marvel comic book stories, is also a tesseract.

In the 1990s, which of these future stars racked up a series of World Karting Association championships?

A) Helio Castroneves

B) Dario Franchitti

C) Danica Patrick

D) Dan Wheldon

Previous answer: Emil Sitka nearly became a Stooge himself.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Saturday, February 9

If you're one of the Beatles, "Penny Lane" may be in your ears and in your eyes, but for many Liverpudlians, the street brings mixed emotions, since it was named for James Penny, who made his fortune in the slave trade. As such, there has been talk of renaming it, not least because tourists like to steal the street signs. For John and Paul, it was where they got a bus to go downtown.

On what edition of "CSI" did David Caruso, as Horatio Cane, perfect the art of dramatically removing his sunglasses, usually before delivering a bad pun?

A) Las Vegas

B) Los Angeles

C) Miami

D) New York

Previous answer: Danica Patrick was a go-kart champ as a kid.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 11

Monday, February 11

At the 1912 Olympics in Stockholm, a Japanese runner named Shizo Kanakuri entered the marathon. Given the unseasonal heat, he collapsed midway through, was taken care of by a Swedish farm family and went back to Japan. Without telling the Olympic officials. He was reported missing, but in 1966, a TV station invited him back to finish the run, making his final time 54 years, 8 months, 6 days, 8 hours, 32 minutes and 20.3 seconds.

Almost all of the world's 50 tallest skyscrapers are on what continent?

A) Asia

B) Europe

C) North America

D) South America

Previous answer: Horatio Cane was on "CSI: Miami."

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Tuesday, February 12

The locals just call Bangkok "Krung Thep," which literally means City of Angels. That's what Los Angeles means, too. And as it happens, LA's Thai community is so large that the city is sometimes called Thailand's 77th province. By the way, Guinness says that Thailand has the world capital with the longest name: City of angels, great city of immortals, magnificent city of the nine gems, seat of the king, city of royal palaces, et cetera, et cetera.

What colony, the first one established by Europeans on mainland Asia, also became the last one, when Portugal handed it over to China in 1999?

A) East Timor

B) Goa

C) Hong Kong

D) Macau

Previous answer: Aside from about a half dozen buildings in New York and Chicago, all the world's tall buildings are in Asia.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Wednesday, February 13

As a writer, John Kennedy Toole was a failure. He had sent his manuscript repeatedly to publishers, but got nowhere. In 1969 he killed himself. His mother, though, found a carbon copy of the book and used her connections to get "A Confederacy of Dunces" published. And it won the Pulitzer Prize. There have also been attempts to make a movie of it, starring everybody from John Belushi to John Candy to Will Ferrell.

In the Ian Fleming books, what Bond villain dies when he is buried under tons of bird excrement?

A) Blofeld

B) Dr. No

C) Goldfinger

D) Moonraker

Previous answer: Now the Chinese Las Vegas, Macau used to be in Portuguese hands.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Thursday, February 14

The 1940 film, "My Little Chickadee," paired two of the biggest and most controversial movie stars of the day. Mae West was exceptionally liberated sexually for the era, and WC Fields was killing himself slowly with alcohol. The movie ends with the two stars saying the other's catchphrase: Fields, for example, says, "Why don't you come up and see me sometime?"

What future lead singer of Blondie says she almost accepted a ride home from Ted Bundy?

A) Sheena Easton

B) Debbie Harry

C) Chrissie Hynde

D) Bonnie Tyler

Previous answer: Dr. No dies ignominiously.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Friday, February 15

Anson Williams is best known for playing Potsie on "Happy Days." Actually, he's only known for playing Potsie on "Happy Days," although he also got a lot of work directing TV shows. Even so, Anson Williams is, sadly, probably better known than his second cousin, Henry Heimlich, for whom a maneuver that saves choking people is named. (Williams was born Anson William Heimlich, although his dad changed it to Heimlick).

If Alaska became an independent country, it would be bigger than all but how many countries, not counting Greenland or the U.S. itself?

A) 15

B) 25

C) 35

D) 45

Previous answer: Debbie Harry might have become one of Ted Bundy's victims. Or so she says.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Saturday, February 16

In 1977, Richard Booth declared himself King Richard Coeur de Livre of Hay-on-Wye, declaring the Welsh village to be its own independent country, with his horse as prime minister. The whole thing was largely a tourism stunt, although the community was already famous for its bookstores. In 1988, they added a literary festival. Sadly, in 2005, Booth sold his bookstore and the king moved to Germany.

What animal is the national animal of both India and Bangladesh?

A) Afghan tiger

B) Bengal tiger

C) Punjab tiger

D) Siberian tiger

Previous answer: Smaller than Libya, but larger than Iran, Alaska would be smaller than just 15 countries.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 18

Monday, February 18

In 2009, when the Arizona Cardinals made the Super Bowl, that left behind the so-called Forlorn Five: teams that had never made the Super Bowl.

Then the New Orleans Saints made the Big Game in 2010, leaving behind the Forlorn Four: Cleveland Browns, Detroit Lions, Jacksonville Jaguars and Houston Texans. Of those, however, all but Cleveland has hosted the game, making the Browns especially forlorn.

I like Mount Rushmore, so I have one of each of the coins and one of each of the bills, depicting a president from Rushmore. How much money do I have?

$5.31

$8.31

$10.36

$12.16

Previous answer: The Bengal tiger represents two nations.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Tuesday, February 19

After World War II, Jean-Paul Sartre said that French intellectuals had to chose between collaboration or resistance. Technically, Sartre was in the French Resistance but only barely. Aside from some contributions to Albert Camus's underground newspapers, his works easily passed Nazi censors, for example. Camus once said that he "tried to make history from his armchair" and he myself noted, "The horror was intolerable, but it suited us well."

What star of the "American Pie" movies did indeed play clarinet as a teenager ... maybe even at band camp?

A) Shannon Elizabeth

B) Alyson Hannigan

C) Tara Reid

D) Mena Suvari

Previous answer: $8.61 is the penny, nickel and quarter, and the $1, $2 and $5, which depict Washington, Jefferson and Lincoln. Teddy Roosevelt is $0.00.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Wednesday, February 20

In 2012, the few remaining people left in Centralia, Penn. celebrated a sad anniversary: the fiftieth anniversary ... of a still-burning fire. In 1952, a deliberately set fire in a landfill reached a coal outcropping and quickly spread throughout the mine. It's expected to keep burning for another century and the town is now mostly abandoned. Tourists still check out the now-abandoned town.

What is the island for which the New York Islanders are named?

A) Coney Island

B) Long Island

C) Manhattan

D) Staten Island

Previous answer: Alyson Hannigan plays clarinet.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Thursday, February 21

Sri Lanka used to be Ceylon. And in 1982, Sri Lanka changed its capital, too, moving it from Colombo to the Colombo suburb of Sri Jayawardenapura-Kotte, whose name means "the blessed fortress city of growing victory." Thankfully, it is known as Kotte. Colombo, by the way, gets its name, not from the Italian explorer, but from an adaptation of the old Sinhalese name. The city is most famous for the red and white Jami Ul Alfar mosque, one of the prettiest in the world.

Reykjavik is Europe's (and the world's) northernmost national capital, but if you don't count Iceland, what is Europe's northernmost capital?

A) Helsinki

B) Moscow

C) Oslo

D) Riga

Previous answer: The Islanders are named for Long Island, which is on the team logo.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Friday, February 22

Rudolph with your nose so bright, won't you guide my sleigh tonight. You've probably heard the jokes about Rudolph's red nose being a symptom of his binge drinking, but Odd Halvorsen of the University of Oslo took the issue (semi) seriously. In the journal Parasitology Today he blamed this "celebrated discoloration" on a parasitic infection of his respiratory system. He even identified parasites that thrive in the far northern climes.

For a long time, people posted YouTube parodies of the German film "Downfall," in which the subtitles underneath what character's insane rage are replaced with rants about everything from TV to politics?

A) Boris Becker

B) Marlene Dietrich

C) Adolf Hitler

D) Wolfgang Mozart

Previous answer: Helsinki is really far north.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Saturday, February 23

Weighing as much as 370 lbs, William Perry was nicknamed "The Refrigerator." His Super Bowl ring, at size 25, was the largest ever made. That being said, for a man his size he was very fast and very athletic. And very shrewd. He parlayed his popularity with the Bears in a variety of side-ventures: He fought alongside GI Joe, boxed NBA star Manute Boll for charity, recorded two rap songs, appeared on the A-Team and launched a line of BBQ sauce. He also participated in Lingerie Bowl, the Nathan's hot dog eating contest and pro wrestling.

Vladimir Kodric wanted to name the blind cave beetle he discovered in Slovenia in 1933 for himself. But instead it was renamed for somebody it likely shouldn't have been. Who?

A) Charlie Chaplin

B) Charles Darwin

C) Adolf Hitler

D) Pope John Paul II

Previous answer: "Downfall" is about Hitler.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 25

Monday, February 25

English psychologist Lawrence Weiskrantz found that some people who are completely blind people because of problems with the cortex can somehow react to visual stimuli, even without realizing that they have done so. Called blindsight, this mysterious phenomenon may mean that the optic nerve can somehow bypass the cortex, or that cortex blindness isn't what we think it is, or even that other parts of the eye help us see in ways we don't yet understand.

It's equal, oddly enough, to exactly 15/94 of a second, and this smallest unit of medieval time gave its name to what was once thought of as the smallest unit of matter. What is it?

A) Atom

B) Element

C) Molecule

D) Neutron

Previous answer: Anophthalmus hitleri is named for Hitler. The name literally means "Hitler's eyeless one."

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Tuesday, February 26

In addition to being a great movie, Pixar's "Wall-E" is also good illustrate of a philosophical question called the Ship of Theseus paradox. In the film, "Wall-E" is basically immortal because he is constantly repairing and replacing his own parts. Over time, he eventually replaces all his parts. So, if he has no parts in common with what he started out with, is he the same Wall-E? This is an issue for us, too. Our cells die and are replaced, with materials made from the food we eat. Are we the same people we were as babies?

What section of the afterlife did the Vatican abolished in 2007?

A) Limbo

B) Heaven

C) Hell

D) Purgatory

Previous answer: An atom was 15/94 of a second.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Wednesday, February 27

Notwithstanding its name, the town of Waterproof, La., has been flooded several times, most devastatingly in 1927. It has actually been relocated three times because of floods. The name in fact apparently comes from settler Abner Smalley, who had found a rare dry patch of "waterproof" land on which to stand, while waiting for a steamboat. Nowadays, the town's biggest threat isn't water but economic collapse, as schools and businesses close.

Ironically, what Swiss dog breed was nearly wiped out by a series of avalanches in the 1810s?

A) Doberman

B) German shepherd

C) Pomeranian

D) St. Bernard

Previous answer: Limbo no longer exists, apparently.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Thursday, February 28

A democracy is where the people rule. An aristocracy is where elite families rule. But there are other options. If you are a liberal, you may be convinced we live in an albocracy, androcracy, chrysocracy, gerontocracy, hagiocracy or stratocracy, which is government by, respectively, white people, men, the rich, the elderly, holy religious leaders and the military. A conservative, on the other hand, may fret that we have become an ergatocracy, ochlocracy or ptochocracy, rule by, respectively, the workers, the mob and the poor. All might agree we live in a kakistocracy, rule by the worst people.

What celebrity was elected to the board of the Archaeological Institute of America in 2008?

A) Kevin Costner

B) Tom Cruise

C) Harrison Ford

D) Al Pacino

Previous answer: The St. Bernard was nearly wiped out.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Friday, March 1

Today we look at terrible ideas for TV shows that were so bad, their pilots never even made it to the air. For example, Peter Boyle played a grumpy dead cop, who got reincarnated as a flatulent bulldog on "Poochinski." John Denver, of all people, played a Jack-Bauer-esque FBI agent who occasionally broke out into song on "Higher Ground." Alan Alda, before landing "MASH," was in "Where's Everett?" It was about an invisible baby left behind by aliens.

"

After "Star Trek," what Canadian was in "The People, a failed TV pilot about a schoolteacher who moves to a small town occupied by what appear to be flying Amish aliens. Who?

A) James Doohan

B) Leonard Nimoy

C) William Shatner

D) George Takei

Previous answer: The former Indiana Jones, Harrison Ford, joined the board of the Archaeological Institute of America.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Saturday, March 2

Nowadays, the Oscars attract more attention for celebrity frocks than for the actual awards themselves. When Lizzie Gardiner won an Oscar for Best Costume Design, she accepted in a dress she'd made from 254 AmEx Gold cards. She had won the prize for "Priscilla, Queen of the Desert." AmEx played along: It issued each card in her name, although none of them were valid.

Who quoted Numbers 23:23, when he asked "What hath God wrought?" on May 24, 1844?

A) Abraham Lincoln

B) Samuel Morse

C) Harriet Tubman

D) William Wordsworth

Previous answer: William Shatner was in "The People." Poor guy.

TRIVIA FANS: Send the trivia questions you've always wanted answered, or original TriviaBits ideas of your own, with your full name and hometown, to Paul Paquet at paul@triviahalloffame.com or visit him online at www.triviahalloffame.com.

Paul Paquet has been writing trivia since the early 1990s, and has written roughly 100,000 questions. For more, visit triviahalloffame.com or e-mail him at paul@triviahalloffame.com.

COPYRIGHT 2013 PAUL PAQUET

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