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james dulley


Proper Design for a Smoke-Free Fireplace Dear James: I am adding a room on to my house, and it will have a fireplace. The existing fireplace in the living room is often smoky. How can I keep the new fireplace from filling the room with smoke? — Jon C. Dear Jon: Smoke from a wood-…Read more. Apply a French-Polish Finish to Woodwork Dear James: I recently bought an older house. It has beautiful cherry woodwork that needs to be refinished. I have heard about a French polish finish. Is this a good finish to use and how do I do it? — Carol J. Dear Carol: Nothing is more …Read more. It Is Not Difficult to Lay Wall-to-Wall Carpeting Dear James: My children are getting older now, and it is probably time for some new wall-to-wall carpeting. If I can install it myself, I can afford to do all the rooms. Is this a job for a do-it-yourselfer? — John G. Dear John: Although most …Read more. Circuit Breakers for Electrical Safety Dear James: There were two electrical house fires in my neighborhood this year, and both houses had circuit breakers. Please explain the differences between fuses, breakers, ground fault and arc fault circuit interrupters and which are best. — …Read more.
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Heads Up! Drywall Nails are Popping


Q: My house seems to be well built, but the heads on the drywall nails are popping out and they look terrible. How can I fix them and avoid a similar problem in a room addition I am planning? — Stella J.

A: Nail pops can be particularly noticeable at night when lamps are on near a wall. The light rays nearly parallel to the wall will cast shadows from even a slightly raised nailhead. It is a common problem in most homes, so you should not be alarmed by just a few of them. Your ceiling or walls will not fall down.

It is not difficult to fix existing nail pops. If the nailhead is sticking out far enough to get a grip on it with a pry bar or pliers, pull it out. If you cannot get a hold on it, drive it back into the drywall, just slightly below the surface. Try not to drive it in so far that it breaks through the drywall paper skin.

Buy some drywall screws. Drill the proper size starter hole next to the old nail hole, through the drywall and into the supporting lumber. Screw in the drywall screw to a depth of only about one-thirty-second of an inch below the surface. Don't let its head break through the paper skin. The screw will hold it securely.

Spread some spackling compound over the nailheads and the screw. Drywall tape compound, called "mud", is sometimes easier to use than spackling and it has better adhesive properties. Sand it smooth and paint the area with primer. If you put the finish coat of paint over the patch without primer, the surface texture will look different and the spot could be noticeable when the paint dries.

While you are at it, if there are several nail pops, consider installing additional drywall screws in spots where the nails have not popped through yet.

It won't take a lot longer once you have the tools and spackling ready.

The key to eliminating drywall nail pops in your future room addition is to make sure the lumber used it not overly moist. Even though the lumber was properly dried at the mill, it could have picked up moisture from being stored outdoors. If you suspect the lumber might be damp, keep it protected indoors for a week for the moisture content to stabilize to that of your home.

If the drywall is nailed to damp lumber and later the lumber dries and shrinks slightly, a small gap can form between the drywall and the lumber. If the drywall gets pushed against the lumber for any reason, nailheads pop out.

Be certain to have the builder use drywall nails, not ordinary nails. Drywall nails have a head design to reduce the possibility of tearing paper drywall skin when hammered in place.

Screws take longer to install, but they are the best drywall fastener. The nails or screws, regardless of which is used, should be spaced properly so the drywall is adequately supported. One foot apart is the maximum spacing when attaching drywall for a ceiling. Installing them closer together is not going to increase the building costs much and will reduce the chances of nail pops.

Send your questions to Here's How, 6906 Royalgreen Dr., Cincinnati, OH 45244 or visit To find out more about James Dulley and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at



2 Comments | Post Comment
I bought my house new 6 years ago and find that the ends of my roof by the rain gutters you can see into my attic. They have the shingles overlapping into the gutters and when was cleaning my gutters there is a 2'' gap all the way around. I live in Georgia and wanted to know if I should be concerned about this.
J Sikes
Comment: #1
Posted by: joe sikes
Sun Jun 21, 2015 10:34 AM
I just started renting a house and have noticed "nail pops" and / or "screw pops" in many of the rooms, particularly in the ceilings. What will happen in the house if these "nail pops" and / or "screw pops" are not repaired? This house was built in 2011 from what I understand.
Comment: #2
Posted by: J England
Fri Jul 17, 2015 12:59 AM
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