creators home
creators.com lifestyle web
Marilyn Beck & Stacy Jenel Smith

Recently

ASK STACY -- 05/30/15 DEAR STACY: Did they ever find Estelle Getty's Emmy? — C_M14 DEAR C_M14: Nope, the statuette that Getty finally won in 1988 for her supporting work on "The Golden Girls" (she was nominated seven times), is still on the Location Unknown list. …Read more. Chris and Heidi Powell Tackle Couples' Extreme Weight Loss Season five of "Extreme Weight Loss" launches tonight, May 26, and this year there will be a couple of new variations on the popular theme of long-term weight loss journeys. "This season we're dabbling with something that Heidi and I have been …Read more. Ask Stacy -- Week of 5/23/15 DEAR STACY: Please settle a trivial question. The actress who plays Ursula the Sea Witch on "Once Upon a Time" — I believe she was on a show called "Summerland" years ago. Am I right? — L.W., Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin DEAR L.W.: Yes, …Read more. Jazmyn Simon of Dwayne Johnson's 'Ballers' Loves Playing With the Boys If you've seen any of the HBO promos for Dwayne Johnson's June 21-debuting "Ballers," you know the half-hour dramedy about a retired pro football player looks like a high octane, chest thumping, head bumping, heart pumping, flash-with-cash …Read more.
more articles

‘House of Lies' Not Being Treated Like a ‘Black Show,' Says Glynn Turman/Steven Tyler Wishes He Could Let Emotions Flow in Witty Way

Comment

Don Cheadle's "House of Lies" has already been picked up for its second season, and costar Glynn Turman is quick to applaud Showtime for its support of the series that has Cheadle as a slick, smart, ruthless and debauched management consultant for greedy Wall Street giants.

"They're so behind it, pumping and putting it out there," he notes.

This being Black History Month, Turman looks at "House of Lies" through the lens of race. In his opinion, "It's not being treated like a 'black show.' If there is a show with a black lead, it's not usually given the push that other shows are given. But with this show, the wheels that make things a success are really spinning."

Turman has a permanent place in black cinema history, thanks to his role in the classic 1975 "Cooley High." He's observed changes in film and TV with regard to African Americans since then, and he's observed slips backward. The day of the African American network comedy, for example, has pretty much gone away.

The bitingly satirical "House of Lies" — which is, in case you didn't know, a very wild Showtime show full of sex, drugs and profanity — is in a category unto itself.

Turman, who plays Cheadle's retired shrink dad, feels the show "does a wonderful job in presenting Don and his family, me included, as human beings. The issues we see him struggling with have less to do with him being black than him being

human. That's one of the things that's so refreshing about it. The color issue is so secondary to his relationships with his coworkers, his boss. His coworker is a beautiful, young, blond, white girl," he notes, referring to Kristen Bell. "His ex-wife (Dawn Olivieri) is a white woman ...

They're not ignoring his color. When issues come up, they tackle the issues."

Cheadle's wily character is also not above playing the race card, if it's to his advantage. As Turman notes, "This is a guy who says, 'This can work for me. I can use this.' I think that's so timely." Its occupation with Wall Street "hits right on the sore spot of the country. I think everybody's still in shock after seeing it," Turman adds with a laugh. "People are saying, 'Can they do that?'"

'IDOL' TALK: "American Idol" judge Steven Tyler shrugs off comparisons between himself and predecessor Simon Cowell, admitting, "Sometimes I wish I had that side where I'd let my emotions flow in a very witty kind of way. The best I could come up with was 'Did you bump your head on the way in here?' or 'Did you eat a lot of paint chips as a child?' I thought that was good.'" He laughs.

Of course, it's not comparisons to Cowell that anyone on "Idol" is worrying about these days, what with the show being given a run for its money — and its viewers — by NBC's hit "The Voice," which has a fresher format. More "Idol" judge interaction and less long-winded critiques (yes, we mean you, Randy Jackson) wouldn't hurt.

NICOTINE FITNESS: "The Biggest Loser" trainer Bob Harper lets us know that plenty of contestants on the show come in as hardcore smokers. Viewers are just not made aware of that fact. "Oh, they're absolutely going through their nicotine withdrawals. We don't focus on it, because we have zero tolerance for it," he explains. "When you come into our world, cigarettes don't exist. Smoking is absolutely forbidden." This could explain why some contestants seem unduly surly or downright bonkers on the show, in which people also tend to break into tears fairly often.

To find out more about Marilyn Beck and Stacy Jenel Smith and read their past columns, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

COPYRIGHT 2012 MARILYN BECK AND STACY JENEL SMITH
DISTRIBUTED BY CREATORS.COM



Comments

0 Comments | Post Comment
Already have an account? Log in.
New Account  
Your Name:
Your E-mail:
Your Password:
Confirm Your Password:

Please allow a few minutes for your comment to be posted.

Enter the numbers to the right:  
Creators.com comments policy
Other similar columns
Lynda Hirsch
Jennifer Merin
Around the World
by Jennifer Merin
Holiday Mathis
Horoscopes by Holiday
by Holiday Mathis
More
Marilyn Beck & Stacy Jenel Smith
May. `15
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
26 27 28 29 30 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
About the author About the author
Write the author Write the author
Printer friendly format Printer friendly format
Email to friend Email to friend
View by Month