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Alexander Cockburn
Alexander Cockburn
13 Jul 2012
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Change that Really Means Something

Comment

The disadvantages to the McCain-Palin ticket don't need much explication. McCain has never risen to the challenge of the world financial crisis and this failure has shriveled his chances to near invisibility. Though Sarah Palin has enough horse sense to attack Wall Street greed, it's a brave soul who would argue that she's ready to run the country, which in the unlikely event of Republican victory she might well have to do. So we're left with Obama-Biden. In these last days before the election, I've been scraping around, trying to muster a single positive reason to encourage a vote for Obama. Please note my accent on the positive, since the candidate himself has couched his appeal in this idiom. Why vote for Obama-Biden as opposed to against the McCain-Palin ticket?

Obama invokes change. Yet never has the dead hand of the past had a "reform" candidate so firmly by the windpipe.

Is it possible to confront America's problems without talking about the arms budget, now entirely out of control? The Pentagon is spending more than at any point since the end of World War II. In "real dollars" — admittedly an optimistic concept these days — the $635 billion appropriated in fiscal year 2007 is 5 percent above the previous all-time high, reached in 1952. Depending on how you count them, the Empire has somewhere between 700 and 1,000 overseas bases.

Obama wants to enlarge the armed services by 92,000. He pledges to escalate the war in Afghanistan, to attack Pakistan's sovereign territory if it obstructs any unilateral mission to kill Osama bin Laden, and to wage a war against terror in a hundred countries, creating for this purpose a new international intelligence and law enforcement "infrastructure" to take down terrorist networks. A fresh start? Where does this differ from Bush's commitment to Congress on Sept. 20, 2001, to an ongoing "war on terror" against "every terrorist group of global reach" and "any nation that continues to harbor or support terrorism"?

Obama's liberal defenders comfort themselves with the thought that "he had to say that to get elected." He didn't. After eight years of Bush, Americans are receptive to reassessing America's imperial role. Obama has shunned this opportunity. If elected, he will be prisoner of his promise that on his watch, Afghanistan will not be lost nor will the white man's burden be shirked.

Whatever drawdown of troops in Iraq that does take place in the event of Obama's victory will be a brief hiccup amid the blare and thunder of fresh "resolve." In the event of Obama's victory, the most immediate consequence overseas will most likely be brusque imperial reassertion. Already Joe Biden, the shopworn poster boy for Israeli intransigence and cold war hysteria, is yelping stridently about the new administration's "mettle" being tested in the first six months by the Russians and their surrogates.

Obama is far more hawkish than McCain on Iran.

After eight years of unrelenting assault on constitutional liberties by Bush and Cheney, public and judicial enthusiasm for tyranny has waned. Obama has preferred to stand with Bush and Cheney. In February, seeking a liberal profile in the primaries, Obama stood against warrantless wiretapping. His support for liberty did not survive its second trimester; he aborted it with a vote for warrantless wiretapping. The man who voted to reaffirm the awful Patriot Act declared that "the ability to monitor and track individuals who want to attack the United States is a vital counterterrorism tool."

Every politician, good or bad, is an ambitious opportunist. But beneath this topsoil, the ones who make a constructive dent on history have some bedrock of consistency, of fidelity to some central idea. In Obama's case, this "idea" is the ultimate distillation of identity politics: the idea of his blackness. Those who claim that if he were white he would be cantering effortlessly into the White House do not understand that without his most salient physical characteristic, Obama would be seen as a second-tier senator with unimpressive credentials.

As a political organizer of his own advancement, Obama is a wonder. But I have yet to identify a single uplifting intention to which he has remained constant if it has presented the slightest risk to his advancement. Summoning all the optimism at my disposal, I suppose we could say he has not yet had occasion to offend two important constituencies and adjust his relatively decent stances on immigration and labor-law reform. Public funding of his campaign? A commitment made becomes a commitment betrayed, just as on warrantless eavesdropping. His campaign treasury is now a vast hogswallow that, if it had been amassed by a Republican, would be the topic of thunderous liberal complaint.

In substantive terms, Obama's run has been the negation of almost every decent progressive principle, a negation achieved with scarcely a bleat of protest from the progressives seeking to hold him to account. The Michael Moores stay silent. Abroad, Obama stands for imperial renaissance. He has groveled before the Israel lobby and pandered to the sourest reflexes of the cold war era. At home, he has crooked the knee to bankers and Wall Street, to the oil companies, the coal companies, the nuclear lobby, the big agricultural combines. He is even more popular with Pentagon contractors than McCain and has been the most popular of the candidates with K Street lobbyists. He has been fearless in offending progressives, constant in appeasing the powerful.

So no, this is not an exciting or liberating moment in America's politics such as might have been possible after the Bush years. Listening to my complaints about Obama, a friend of mine in New York asked what alternative I had to offer. Since the split for Obama-Biden is roughly 70-30 in New York, I told her it didn't matter. She could write in the straight Wiccan ticket if she felt so inclined. It wouldn't make any difference, any more than it would in California, where you can vote for Nader or Barr or McKinney and Obama would win regardless. And wouldn't Barr be the first mustachioed occupant of the White House since Teddy Roosevelt? This would be change that really means something.

COPYRIGHT 2008 CREATORS SYNDICATE, INC.



Comments

3 Comments | Post Comment
If Obama wins and is as miltaristic as he sometimes seems, then either we will collapse under the weight of our military machine and the resources it demands, or someone who represents real change, (Kucinich, Feingold etc) will emerge to save us from ourselves.
Comment: #1
Posted by: michael nola
Fri Oct 31, 2008 8:11 PM
Do not worry about Obama being militaristic, if elected. The Draft will have to return ... I can't imagine anyone volunteering to serve in the military with him as C-I-C.
'Kucinich'?... Cleveland lives up to the moniker "Mistake On The Lake" because they continue to elect this Idiot.
Comment: #2
Posted by: USMCMOE
Sat Nov 1, 2008 2:30 PM
FUNNY.. I GUESS DEMOCRATS AND REPUBLICANS HEAR WITH DIFFERENT EARS.
OBAMA TOOK SOME GUFF FROM MCCAIN FOR SAYING THAT HE WOULD TALK TO THE ENEMY, AND LOOK FOR COMMON GROUND.
I KNOW THAT WHAT YOU SAID HE SAID ABOUT AFGHANISTAN IS TRUE.. BUT HE SAID NOTHING ABOUT ATTACKING ANYBODY ELSE.
Comment: #3
Posted by: SUSIE
Sun Nov 2, 2008 6:14 PM
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