creators home
creators.com lifestyle web
Dr. Sylvia Rimm

Recently

College Son Needs Evaluation Q: Our son just finished his first year at a university. When his grades came in, he had failed all but one subject. His high school career was similar. He pulled his grades up at the last minute, never did his homework and never completed his …Read more. Child Over-Empowered Early Q: I'm writing concerning my 13-year-old granddaughter. Her parents over-empowered her at an early age. As soon as she could communicate, she was constantly asked what she would like to do today, eat today, etc. The parents have been trying to take …Read more. What Will Next School Year Bring Q: We're worried about our daughter moving on to first grade. There will be some changes in the teachers next year, and one of the teachers moving into our child's grade next year causes us great concern. Several teachers have stated that they would …Read more. Parents Should Set Friendship Values Q: My 8-year-old son is on a baseball team, and most of the boys are good kids, but one child is a bad influence. This boy uses horrible language and is very disrespectful to his parents and the coach. The boy's family continually asks my son over …Read more.
more articles

An Inspiring Message to Grand Grandparents

Comment

Q: My friend wrote this letter for all grandmas, and it was included in the "Letters to the Editor" section of the Lorain Journal in Ohio. She gave me permission to share the letter with you in your column. Here it is:

Letter for All Grandmas:

I would like to share this with other grandmas. I became a great-grandma this year. A wonderful gift. I can hold and hug this little one. But what about all the babies who will join our family when I'm gone? I love them, too. I made some little outfits and carefully put them into a sturdy box, along with the following letter:

Dear Baby: These outfits were made for all the "little ones" who will be joining our family. I'll not be here to hold and kiss each of you — but my love and care has been tucked into every stitch. Welcome to our family.

I pray your life will be full of love and joy. Find all the good things this world has to give.

So my dear child, dream your dreams and climb those mountains. And always know you were loved, long before you got here. — Ida Horning, Sheffield Lake, Ohio

A: There are some great-grandparents, many grandparents and thousands of parents who read my columns. I was hoping to pass Ida Horning's message on to all of you, so that you can remember to share your work with future members of your families. All my readers know that I emphasize the importance of work in life because work and accomplishment establish identities, self-confidence and your legacies to the future. The work that I would encourage you to pass to your families may or may not be related to your salaried employment. It could be your music, art, crafts, writing, recipes or your thoughts and memories of your life.

It can be in the form of words, music, pictures or products you've created.

Those of us who have never met our grandparents or great-grandparents often feel a void or lack of connection with our ancestors. That void no longer has to be there. You, as grandparents, can record, write, speak, crochet, knit, construct or paint your messages of love to your grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Ask your children to pass them forward in the future. Ida Horning's letter inspired me to be certain to pass on my parenting books. I will autograph each one and give them to each grandchild.

If you are parents, you can encourage your children's grandparents to pass on the work by recording conversations with them about memories of their childhood or even experiences into adulthood. My assistant, Shirley, shared with me how she talked to her ailing mother about her favorite recipes and then prepared a book of those recipes. Now her mother's stories can be shared with future generations.

Will you pass on your songs, your woodwork, your sewing or your jokes? Your loving message will provide connection for the generations ahead. Thank you, Ida, for your inspiring letter.

For a free newsletter about the do's and don'ts of grandparenting, send a self-addressed, stamped envelope to the address below.

Dr. Sylvia B. Rimm is the director of the Family Achievement Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio, a clinical professor of psychiatry and pediatrics at the Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and the author of many books on parenting. More information on raising kids is available at www.sylviarimm.com. Please send questions to: Sylvia B. Rimm on Raising Kids, P.O. Box 32, Watertown, WI 53094 or srimm@sylviarimm.com. To read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate website at www.creators.com.

COPYRIGHT 2010 CREATORS.COM



Comments

0 Comments | Post Comment
Already have an account? Log in.
New Account  
Your Name:
Your E-mail:
Your Password:
Confirm Your Password:

Please allow a few minutes for your comment to be posted.

Enter the numbers to the right:  
Creators.com comments policy
More
Dr. Sylvia Rimm
Aug. `14
Su Mo Tu We Th Fr Sa
27 28 29 30 31 1 2
3 4 5 6 7 8 9
10 11 12 13 14 15 16
17 18 19 20 21 22 23
24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 1 2 3 4 5 6
About the author About the author
Write the author Write the author
Printer friendly format Printer friendly format
Email to friend Email to friend
View by Month