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Married to Dr. Jekyll -- and Mr. Hyde

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Dear Annie: I have been married to the same man for decades. "Ralph" has always preferred the company of females, but lately, all he talks about are other women — their physical attributes, how intelligent and personable they are, etc. He tells me about going out to dinner with them (supposedly with a group of people). He states in business e-mails how attractive they are. He tells me how he flirts and teases. He is very obvious about looking at other women while he is with me.

I hear him on the phone speaking to them gently and softly, yet he never speaks to me that way. Ralph criticizes my thoughts, looks, opinions and feelings, yet when I question his behavior, he claims I am the love of his life and his rock. He tells other people that I am exactly what he wants. He denies adultery. He denies wanting out of our relationship. He states that whenever he is disrespectful to me, he doesn't know why and feels bad about it. But his behavior doesn't change.

I feel like I am living with Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. What is going on with my husband? Is he cheating on me? — S.O.S.

Dear S.O.S.: We don't believe Ralph is cheating, but it definitely sounds like a few screws are loose. Any unexplained change in behavior could indicate a medical problem, so first suggest that Ralph see his doctor for a complete workup. Then ask him to go with you for counseling. He is not behaving in a respectful manner toward the woman he supposedly loves, and you both need to find out why.

Dear Annie: Years ago, parents used to put up placards in their children's bedroom windows to let firemen know where they were in case of fire. That proved dangerous because pedophiles also knew which bedrooms the children were in.

Now parents are putting up stick figures of their families on the back of the car windows, including how many boys and girls they have.

Yesterday, I saw a car with two soccer ball emblems in the back window, each with the name of one of two girls. I assume those two girls were their daughters. To me, this is as dangerous as the window placards because any pedophile could follow the car home and target the children in the future. Should I be concerned for these children? — New York

Dear N.Y.: You have raised a valid point. Parents are eager to show off their kids, but they should be mindful of the circumstances. Publicizing the fact that you have young children by displaying emblems on your home or car windows (especially with names) can invite trouble. While it is extremely unlikely that a pedophile would follow your car home, it is still a possibility that should not be ignored. It's the same reason you don't leave your front door unlocked even if you live in a safe neighborhood. The chance of a break-in is remote, but not impossible.

Dear Annie: I can identify with "No Photo Op," the woman who was handed an envelope containing pictures of her mother lying in her casket.

When my grandmother died, I was pregnant and lived 1,000 miles away and could not attend the funeral. Months later, I received a letter from my mother that contained photos of a trip she and my dad had taken. In the middle of those photos, I was horror stricken to find one of my grandmother in her coffin.

My grandmother was Irish and a lively person. That's how I would like to remember her. But 31 years later, all I can picture is my grandmother in her coffin. Your advice to ask first was spot on. — Still Stunned in Vermont

Annie's Mailbox is written by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime editors of the Ann Landers column. Please e-mail your questions to anniesmailbox@comcast.net, or write to: Annie's Mailbox, c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777 W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700, Los Angeles, CA 90045. To find out more about Annie's Mailbox and read features by other Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit the Creators Syndicate Web page at www.creators.com.

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Comments

34 Comments | Post Comment
I find those stick figure symbols on the back of mini vans slightly annoying, but pedophile magnets? Come on. The paranoia in this country is over the top. Your children are more likely (statistically speaking) to be kidnapped by your ex husband and molested by your priest. We are raising an entire generation of children who go without the simple pleasure of playing in the front yard with their neighborhood buddies or who are unable to think or fend for themselves because every aspect of their lives is planned and controlled. Of course you must be careful, but part of that has to be teaching kids to be savvy, not bubble-wrapping them until age 18. No wonder they go nuts in college with that first taste of freedom.
Comment: #1
Posted by: Brogan
Mon Jul 12, 2010 10:50 PM
Brogan: There may be some parents who are too paranoid when it comes to attempting to protect their children from every possible danger and end up compromising their freedom. But pasting your childrens names on the back of the car is pointless and dangerous. That's how kidnappers get kids in their cars; they find out the kids' names and tell them that their mom or dad sent them to pick them up. NOT pasting the names of your small children on the back of your frickin van isn't being paranoid, it's being smart. What "simple pleasures" are being taken away from those poor children who have parents who don't have those stick figures on the back of Mommy's car? They're being "bubble wrapped?" Because their parents don't put their likenesses on the family car?

And I'd LOVE to see the statistic that says that children are more likely to be molested by their priest than by anyone else. Because the one that I have...and the one that was used in my abnormal psychology class...says that priests are no more likely to be sex offenders than a member of the male general population.
Comment: #2
Posted by: Jules
Mon Jul 12, 2010 11:19 PM
I was kidnapped and molested by a teenage neighbor who lived next door to us. I was 3 1/2 at the time. Posting your child's name on your vehicle is very dangerous. I see a lot of bumper stickers that read something to the effect of "My child is an honor roll student at Santa Lucia School" or something similar. That is also dangerous. These ARE pedophile magnets. We need to safeguard our families and stop announcing personal information on the bumper and/or the back window of the family car. I speak from experience, and trust me, the child molesters do lurk around nearly every corner in your town or city, and they definitely use these "clues" to find their victims. It's better to be safe than sorry. New York is right about these warnings and so were the Annies when they agreed that parents need to be mindful of circumstances that are inviting trouble. Giving these warped adults any reason to personally coerce your child by name or by pretending to be from the Santa Lucia School Honor Society to lure a child into their clutches is detrimental and absolutely unsafe. Please, folks, don't do it. If you doubt me, ask your local police or district attorney's child defense team, and they'll say the same thing: it's unwise.
Comment: #3
Posted by: Jean
Mon Jul 12, 2010 11:38 PM
I agree, however I would like to point out to Jules that sex offenders are NOT ALWAYS part of the male population. Lately there seems to be a wave of female sex offenders as well.
Comment: #4
Posted by: Ismael Rodriguez
Tue Jul 13, 2010 4:05 AM
I agree, however I would like to point out to Jules that sex offenders are not always males. Lately there are a wave of female sex offenders making headlines in the news and most of them already work with the children.
Comment: #5
Posted by: Ismael Rodriguez
Tue Jul 13, 2010 4:13 AM
It seems that if pedophiles are targeting stick figures and bumperstickers, they'd also target mini vans and cars with carseats. I agree posting names is dangerous, but you can't erase all traces of children from your vehicle.
Comment: #6
Posted by: Renee J
Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:31 AM
At one time it was ok to take pictures of people in coffins. They were put in family record books. I took care of my grandmother until her death a year ago. When she passed away, I took pictures of her. Her sister couldn't come as her husband was dying of cancer at the time and she had several other family members who could not come because of the cost of travel. One of her grand daughters had sent her some money for her birthday. Grandma was so tickeled that one of her grandkids remembered her on her day. We made a special trip to a store she liked and she bought a beautiful blouse. She was only able to where it one time before she became to ill to leave the house. I never got to take a picture to send to my cousin. I had her burried in this blouse and told my cousin about it. I took the picture to send to her. My grandma looked so beautiful. My aunt also took a picture of my grand daughter ... the great great grand daughter of my grandma. Granny and her used to play the give and take game. Well, my granddaughter who was only 10 months old thought that meemaw needed to take a flower. She kept trying to give it to meemaw. It was a very special moment. These pictures helped the family who could not be here for this amazing womans funeral. Do I look at them now? No. We also took them in private. Not while guest were present.
A loving grand daughter
Comment: #7
Posted by: Dawn
Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:51 AM
LW1's husband is an incorrigible flirt as well as an insensitive clod. LW1 should inform him that he needs to stop canoodling the ladies pronto or she'll seek the services of a good lawyer.

As for LW2 and all the other people out there cowering in fear of a predator hunting their children let me suggest that you take your children and hide them in their bedrooms until they're 35. If you must bring them out in public, please obscure their identities with a veil or a mask. Please don't mention your children to strangers or give any indication you have them. They're all YOURS.
Comment: #8
Posted by: Chris
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:17 AM
Re: Brogan - Nice post. I agree but it's an argument we will never win I'm afraid.
Comment: #9
Posted by: Rick
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:21 AM
@ Jules - It IS a fact that someone close to the family (priest, uncle, neighbour) is far more likely to abuse a child than a stranger that follows your van home because there are bumper stickers saying "My kid is on the honor roll" on it. Statistically, a child is safer in a group of strangers than a group of acquaintances, friends and family. I don't have any stats for you right now but they are readily available.

@ Jean - You were molested by your neighbour who knew you existed not because of a bumper sticker, but because you were his neighbour. Not putting up bedroom window stickers or bumper stickers would not have prevented that.

I'm not saying that no precautions should be taken, but there's a difference between safety, and paranoia. America has a bad track record for getting paranoid about things that are far less likely to harm you than walking or driving down the road (such as "Africanized" bees, poisoned Hallowe'en candy, etc). So by all means be careful (like Annies say: don't leave your door unlocked because it is unlikely that someone will break in), but also be reasonable. The world is not out to get you.
Comment: #10
Posted by: Zoe
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:21 AM
LW1 who is married to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde needs to be careful choosing a counselor, being sure she gets one with a background in verbal abuse. Men who are very good at switching back and forth from Dr. Jekyll (nice guy to everyone else) to Mr. Hyde (verbal abuser) are very good at pulling the wool over the eyes of many counselors by only showing his nice guy behavior to the counselor. And if he really felt bad about being disrespectful of his wife, he wouldn't do it. Unless someone is mentally ill, they control their behavior. If he was mentally ill, he wouldn't be able to switch to speaking "softly and gently" with these other women.
Comment: #11
Posted by: Elizabeth
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:24 AM
LW1: Sounds like a midlife crisis to me. Try giving your husband a dose of his own medicine and see how that plays out. If he doesn't seem to care, then get him to a doctor. Maybe he isn't cheating yet but it sure sounds like he would, given the opportunity.
Comment: #12
Posted by: Crissy
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:28 AM
Best to advise New York never to put actual chldren in a car, as a pedofhile could easily see them and follow them home. Better yet, advise your readers that children should never be allowed in public for fear of predators spotting them and following them home. Please post a link to an article regarding one single case where a pedophile was known to have spotted a stick figure family on a car, followed them home, and molested their children. Otherwise, please stop your fear mongering.
Comment: #13
Posted by: Kim
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:45 AM
The well-respected FBI criminal profiler John Douglas specifically cites the use of sports decals on cars as a method predators use to track potential victims. This was in his book The Evil That Men Do if I am recalling the correct title. As the commissioner of a teeball league that does sell such decals as a fundraiser, I do not allow orders that include a team name AND a child's name, a child's first AND last name, a child's name AND jersey number, and caution them against having both the sports decal AND any school decal. As parents are we being overprotective? Maybe, but why should we give potential predators any more personal access to our children's information than we should? You don't put a decal with your social security number, checking account number, and full name on your car, so why would you exhibit your sons first and last name, team name, league that he plays in, jersey number that he wears alongside a sticker of where he goes to school and what activities he's involved in there. Not displaying that info is a simple step you can take to protect your child, so why lambast people for suggesting it?
Comment: #14
Posted by: momthecoach
Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:08 AM
The well-respected FBI criminal profiler John Douglas specifically cites the use of sports decals on cars as a method predators use to track potential victims. This was in his book The Evil That Men Do if I am recalling the correct title. As the commissioner of a teeball league that does sell such decals as a fundraiser, I do not allow orders that include a team name AND a child's name, a child's first AND last name, a child's name AND jersey number, and caution them against having both the sports decal AND any school decal. As parents are we being overprotective? Maybe, but why should we give potential predators any more personal access to our children's information than we should? You don't put a decal with your social security number, checking account number, and full name on your car, so why would you exhibit your sons first and last name, team name, league that he plays in, jersey number that he wears alongside a sticker of where he goes to school and what activities he's involved in there. Not displaying that info is a simple step you can take to protect your child, so why lambast people for suggesting it?
Comment: #15
Posted by: momthecoach
Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:09 AM
Yeah, my dad was just like Jekyll/Hyde in LW1. Eventually we found out he was "dating" at least 8 women over about 10 years, paying for their apartments, computers, prescriptions, gas, forming multiple year mistresses. The court psychiatrist said that it was a psychological problem about the way he viewed relationships, but didn't diagnose it with a flashy name. Dad still doesn't think he did anything wrong. Some people just have problems like that. I just hope they BOTH go to counseling, my mom did for almost 8 years and she still didn't see through him (although her psychiatrist did!). Dad quit after a couple of sessions and went right on with himself.

And about photos in coffins, I don't think it is a big deal. I remember an article about a lady who displayed a photo of her stillborn child, and when I asked another person who had lost a baby they didn't see anything wrong with it. People grieve in different ways. I happen to not like looking at people in coffins, but other people comment on how handsome or beautiful the deceased is, and it obviously helps them. I do think it would have been appropriate to warn the LW3 about the photo beforehand so she could have decided for herself what she wanted.
Comment: #16
Posted by: Jackie
Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:50 AM
Re: momthecoach - "...so why would you exhibit your sons first and last name, team name, league that he plays in, jersey number that he wears alongside a sticker of where he goes to school and what activities he's involved in there." Um . . . I don't think anyone ever suggested that all that info be provided on a bumber sticker or window decal. However, Brogan, Chris, Zoe and Kim all have very valid pionts. We have become a very paranoid, fear mongering society and folks like John Douglas profit from it. It is statiscally proven than the vast majority of child abductions (Kryon Horman, Porland, Or for example) and child molestation/abuse comes from people familiar with the kids (post #3) and not from lurking strangers.
Comment: #17
Posted by: Rick
Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:21 AM
This is my first post. I believe the Annie's are seriously mistaken. I agree with Jackie's response. Her story is the more common outcome. I am sorry to have to inform you that "Ralph" is LIKELY cheating. His behavior has reached the point where he uses business resources to contact the women, risking losing his job. He speaks "gently and softly," no longer afraid his wife will overhear. "My wife is my rock" and "My wife is everything I want" are the CLINCHERS -- this husband does not want his wife to leave AND he doesn't want to change whatever he is doing. Hmmm. The correct advice? Meet with a financial counselor to develop a "children's budget and savings plan" so that you both understand how expensive a family is. Also use the time with the financial couselor to discuss how you and your children will financially survive alone if you find that you have to. Bring all of your family financial information to the meeting: banking , deeds, credit cards, credit report...just curious: can you have access to all the information? See your ob/gyn and explain the situation so the doctor can begin appropriate tests. ONLY THEN begin counselling. AND NEVER EVER REVEAL that you know you have the ability to live independently because he may not agree that you are entitled to leave the relationship. Even if he is cheating, he may also have the ability to make life very difficult for you and your children. Sad, but true. If he DOES believe he is entitled to make your sexual choices for you (he can have multiple partners, you cannot) then he probably believes he is entitled to make your financial choices too. HAVE A WRITTEN PLAN OF ACTION with the financial advisor BEFORE relationship counselling. I would like to hear how it turns out.
Comment: #18
Posted by: Eleanor
Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:50 AM
Re: Rick - that should be Kyron Horman, Portland, OR. I can't type today : )
Comment: #19
Posted by: Rick
Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:59 AM
Regarding LW2, I would like to know statistically how many "off the street" predators target kids through honor roll stickers, vinyl tributes to athletic abilities on car windows or through names on the back of sport's uniforms. I think the world is set to fall into a panic when the truth is, predators seek out ways that enable them to have easy access to our children that is less obvious.
They are most successful when we grant them an assumed trust because they seem above reproach. Before my wife and I married I believed that "family" members were safe to leave our child with only to learn my wife is an abuse survivor and her perp was a family member. I believe the only safe we can count on is in what we create for our children at home. When we step out that door, guard up and keep the channels of communication open with our kids letting them know to trust their instincts and if someone makes them feel uncomfortable (even if it seems like nothing) to speak up about it. Breaking the silence is the only way to stop predators from abusing kids. If another adult is paying more attention to your child than you are, be alarmed. It is our job as parents to allow our children to grow up free from abuse.
Comment: #20
Posted by: Marty
Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:27 AM
Thanks to the commenters who point out that most child molesters -- 90 percent, in fact -- know their victim very well. Relatives, friends, sports coaches, etc., have much more opportunity to sexually abuse a child than a stranger who saw a decal on your window. So parents shouldn't focus mostly on hiding the fact that they have children, but on making sure children don't spend too much time alone with one adult -- even a "trusted" adult -- and monitoring adults' behavior and attitude toward kids.
Comment: #21
Posted by: Autumn
Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:38 AM
Matt, where have you gone? I've been reading these columns for years, and while I didn't always agree with your comments, they are always extremely well written and entertaining! Come back to the flock, friend! :)
Comment: #22
Posted by: Cher
Tue Jul 13, 2010 11:22 AM


My Uncle found out the hard way about what people can do with enough information about you. He was out with friends in an upscale restaurant and he told them about a recent mishap with his housekeeper, problems with the pool at his house, and his upcoming trip, etc.. My Uncle was an entertaining person but not especially loud or known to broadcast himself. The man at the next table was paying attention and followed my Uncle home. This stranger, known later as "John" showed up the next day, introduced himself to the housekeeper and said my Uncle extended an invitation to stay for a few days while my Uncle was out of town. "John" laughed with the housekeeper about the mishap, said he was there to help take care of the pool problem, and by the way, my Uncle said his car was available to "John". Four days later when my Uncle returned, there was a huge bash going on at his house, several thousand dollars worth of damage to his car and the final insult? When my Uncle called the police, they didn't believe him, and they made him prove the house was his. His drivers license had his previous address on it, and my Uncle had to produce his birth certificate and deed to the house, which took a day or two and involved my elderly grandparents having to fly 2000 miles to get to him. His housekeeper had told him about the guest and the name and vague description had fit another friend he had extended a "stay anytime" invitation to. By the time the authorities were on my Uncle's side, "John" was long gone. When my Uncle was found dead three years later, his death was initially investigated as a homicide due to the sightings over the years of "John". His unexpected death was later proven to be natural, but still, when my family was grieving, it was even more devastating to think he might have been murdered. When the wrong person has the right information, it can make a terrible difference. I am not saying hide from life, but rather, be careful what you say and what you present about yourself publicly.
Comment: #23
Posted by: Chelle
Tue Jul 13, 2010 11:33 AM
LW1 - It's time to talk to a counselor AND a lawyer - do the former with or without your husband, the latter definitely without your husband - to explore all your options. You know his behavior is wrong and it's time to start taking care of yourself by setting up boundaries and getting your power back in that situation. Yes it's easier said than done and it's hard to change things after a long marriage but if you continue on this way you'll only end up more miserable and more destroyed by your husband's lecherous behavior.

In my opinion he's also behaving disrespectfully towards the women about whom he makes comments and leers, not just his wife. I agree he's not THAT unbalanced if he can change tunes between inside and outside the home that easily - makes me hope he'll get a nice black eye from being whalloped by someone's purse or fist as a wake-up call, but then again that's just me.

LW2 - Those SUV stickers and such ARE a risk, and not just due to pedophiles. My company gave a security presentation in which they indicated people who publicly identify information about themselves - such as the "family stick figures" on a vehicle - have ended up being victims of social engineering.

Basically someone innocuous claiming to be a colleague or associated in some other way can strike up a chat saying "So I notice you have a family," use that to gain the person's trust, then segue that towards getting their foot in the door to proprietary information. Ditto with things such as identity theft and hacking people's systems.

It's not that we should be paranoid and scared of everyone, but we should most definitely be aware that some criminals are sneaker, more adept and basically more evil than before. A criminal who's looking to commit a cyber or identity crime doesn't walk around with a grizzly five o' clock shadow, shifty eyes and a Brooklyn accent - he will most likely appear clean-cut in a three-piece suit with a briefcase because, again, he's trying to earn your trust and he knows being slick as snot is much more likely to get him what he wants.

LW3 - I'm sorry that happened to you. Photos of deceased relatives might be okay or commonplace for some, but for reasons like yours people should still ask whether it's okay to distribute them to others as it might be grim or traumatic.
Comment: #24
Posted by: PS
Tue Jul 13, 2010 2:39 PM
RE: Ismael: That's certainly true, but as priests are males, my point was that when you take the entire male population, me who are priests are no more likely to be sex offenders than men who are not priests. I did not include women because there are no women priests.
RE: Zoe: Same point as above. My point was not that children are less likely to be molested by a priest than a stranger, but that priests alone are no more likely to BE sexual offenders or pedophiles than any other man randomly picked out of the entire population. There are definitely other factors that are associated with who is more likely to molest a child, and you're right, it's most likely for the perpetrator to be SOMEONE the victim knows. But a priest, specifically? No more likely to be a sex offender than anyone else. That's what I objected to.
RE: Renee, Chris, etc: Obviously you can't erase all signs that your child exists. No one is advocating locking them up, but certain actions need to be taken when you want to protect your kids as best you can, using common sense. If I don't let my 5 year old walk to the mall by herself, am I being crazy overprotective? Is that the same as locking her up in her room until she turns 18 or never driving her anywhere because of a paralyzing fear that a pedophile might see her in the car and follow her home? No. But parents have to take common sense steps to protect their child. Some parents might not see the stickers as a danger. Others do. But the letter at least made people think about it, and decide for themselves whether pasting their childs name, team name, and/or jersey number on the back of a car is a risk they want to take. I woudln't take that risk. I figure, if a stranger wants to kidnap my child, why should I just hand him the information he needs, or could use?
No one's banning the stickers but, even if the risk is small, it's still there, and it's still something parents need to CONSIDER before making an informed choice about whether or not to put information about their child in a public place.
Comment: #25
Posted by: Jules
Tue Jul 13, 2010 3:07 PM
I remember the Tot Finder stickers in the window of a child's bedroom when I was young, but I didn't know that it was since considered a pedophile magnet. I'm not questioning that there are dangerous people in the world, and that displaying children's names on cars and clothes is a bad idea. But I'm inclined to agree with Brogan that maybe we've gotten a bit too paranoid. Are there really that many more pedophiles in the world since we were kids? Or does the invention of the 24-hour news cycle build it up as such?
Obviously any occurrence of molestation is one too many, and no one ever wants it to be their child. But to listen to people talk, pedophiles are lurking in every corner of the world, and no child is ever safe by themselves. At some point they're going to have to fend for themselves, and I think teaching kids how to be streetwise would be more constructive.
Comment: #26
Posted by: Jon
Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:45 PM
Re: Cher. Here I am. I don't always have something to add, but I generally read each day's column and comments.
Comment: #27
Posted by: Matt
Wed Jul 14, 2010 12:46 AM
At my child's last well visit, the nurse practitioner went over safety instructions for fires in the home and stranger danger. She mentioned the fire decal problem, which I'd never heard. Her idea was in case of fire, children who are able should throw toys out their window, so firefighters know where to look.
Comment: #28
Posted by: nb
Wed Jul 14, 2010 5:56 AM
Dawn - re: LW3
The issue isn't whether it's OK or not to take pictures of people in their coffins, the issue is whether you should show them to people without first asking if they would like to see them.
Comment: #29
Posted by: Steve
Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:00 PM
Dawn - re: LW3
The issue isn't whether it's OK or not to take pictures of people in their coffins, the issue is whether you should show them to people without first asking if they would like to see them.
Comment: #30
Posted by: Steve
Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:00 PM
Interesting - I definitely only hit "post message" one time, and it showed up twice.
Comment: #31
Posted by: Steve
Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:01 PM
Interesting - I definitely only hit "post message" one time, and it showed up twice.
Comment: #32
Posted by: Steve
Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:01 PM
SOS:
This behavior is called Emotional Abuse. It is a form of Domestic Violence. Sure ask him to go to the doctora complete work up (I really don't think they would find anything) If Ralph is not cheating he is most liekly thinking about it. Going to counsling together when there is emotional abuse going on is not a good idea you won't be able to say what you want in that room even though the counsler may say you can but remember you still have to go home with him. I would tell him that you find this behavior disrespectful and if it doesn't stop you will prepare to walk. Nobody deservies to be abused in any form!!
Comment: #33
Posted by: CMO
Fri Jul 16, 2010 3:42 PM
"Years ago, parents used to put up placards in their children's bedroom windows to let firemen know where they were in case of fire. That proved dangerous because pedophiles also knew which bedrooms the children were in. "

Good grief. Can anybody give me one single, solitary example of a child who was abducted because of one of these placards? I strongly doubt it.

Going by this person's so-called "logic", we need to completely eradicate from our homes and cars any and all signs that we have children. So from now on, no toys, swingsets, playhouse, or any other trappings of childhood in the back yard. All curtains must remain closed at all times, lest these swarms of pedophiles catch a glimpse through a window and see something that might reveal the resence of a child. Probably a good idea to just brick up your windows entirely, actually. In fact, it's best to not let the children ever leave the house; a pedophile might see them while lurking behind the bushes. In fact, we need to outlaw bushes, hedges, and trees, so as to ensure these hordes of dangerous predators have nothing to hide behind as they lurk in waiting to seize your child from your loving grasp the minute you turn your back.

And of course, talking to anybody you don't know is now entirely out of the question; you might accidentally let slip that you have children, and before you know it, seedy-looking men in grubby trenchcoats driving nondescript white vans will be lined up around the block.

In fact, if you're so insanely paranoid about the slightest possibility of something bad happening to your children, if you're so far beyond reason that you actually give credence to the nonsensical idea that a sticker in your car window can and will result in your children being abducted from your house, you're probably better off not having children at all.
Comment: #34
Posted by: RobC
Mon Jul 26, 2010 8:33 PM
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Kathy Mitchell and Marcy Sugar
Jul. `14
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